Urban Farms and Agriculture in Hong Kong

This is not a discourse on urban farms and agriculture in Hong Kong. This is a photo-essay about Hong Kong focusing on urban farms and agriculture in the territory. For interest’s sake, currently only about 5% of all the land in Hong Kong is used for growing food.  I don’t know if that figure includes rooftop gardens that are springing up in various parts of the city on top of high-rises in the form of DIY Farms,  or if it includes the many home gardens where people struggle to grow some veggies in styrofoam containers. Food growing is definitely on the rise. Sadly, real farmers find the land they farm is constantly under threat from developers.

Urban farming and agriculture in Hong Kong

Urban Farms and Agriculture in Hong Kong

1. Po Lam DIY Farms

Friends of ours took us to the podium level of their residential estate to show us the little farms that had sprung up there. In the corner of the podium there was this thriving little paradise. Each tiny little 4×3′ plot can be rented on a monthly basis. It looks to me like some have a long term lease on their plot. They were growing roses and all sorts of things.

Urban farming and agriculture in Hong Kong

Yes!! Really… this is the size of the plot you can rent to grow a bit of food for a month or two. It might not produce enough food to survive on, but it is at least producing food. They are a great idea for kids to find out where food comes from and how it’s grown. In fact, many schools in Hong Kong have begun to foster growing projects inside the school grounds for educational purposes.

2. DIY Farm in Nam Chung 

In a tiny village on the other side of the Plover Cove Country Park, there is a long, straight road leading into the mountains. Near the village there are some DIY farms that have sprung up in the past couple of years. Some of them are big and some are about the size of a large backyard in North America or UK. Land is for rent, in this area, on a 6 month or yearly basis.

Urban Farming and Agriculture in Hong Kong

Netting is used to keep the birds off the vegetables. It doesn’t always work though!! This Bulbul bird got caught in the act. His mate was sitting on the fence scolding him soundly and looking more than a bit worried.

Urban Farms and Agriculture in Hong Kong

3. Herboland on Lamma Island

Herboland is located next to the Hung Shing Ye beach, about a half hour walk from the ferry pier at Yung Shue Wan. You can find all manner of herbs there. I bet you didn’t know coffee is an herb!!

Urban farming and agriculture in Hong Kong

They’re not open every day. You can check out their Facebook page in the About section for their hours and the phone number. It’s all in Chinese, but I think you can figure it out!

4.Tai O 

One day, on a hike, we crossed a field and in the middle of the path there was an old lady cleaning her rice. Beside her, was a field of lettuce that she had farmed herself. I won’t post a picture of the lady, but I’ll show you her little piece of paradise at the end of the village on stilts.

Urban Farming and Agriculture in Hong Kong

Here are her perfect little lettuces.

Urban Farming and Agriculture in Hong Kong

5. Mui Wo (Silvermine Bay)

If I could have a home in the country, it would be in Mui Wo, Lantau Island. Accessible by car and ferry, it has a thriving Expat community. It’s only half an hour by ferry to Central business district. It’s still a quiet country village, but it’s got some great cafes.

I always knew Mui Wo was great, but one day we took a walk further into the village away from the ferry pier. What we found was a total surprise. Along side some really modern village houses there were fields of vegetables growing.

Urban Farming and Agriculture in Hong Kong

This fellow was keeping the “evil” away from the garden. He’s wearing a Little Miss Sunshine shirt, so he can’t be that scary!

Urban Farming and Agriculture in Hong Kong

That’s it for today, folks! I hope you enjoyed your tour of urban farms and agriculture in Hong Kong. I didn’t include mine because you’ve already seen it, exhaustively! But if you want to check it out again you can look at my post about growing tomatoes in Hong Kong. You will see a glimpse of my garden there.

Got any questions or thoughts about urban farms and agriculture in Hong Kong? Let me know in the comments section below!

Cheers!

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